How to trim your resume to one page

From spelling and grammatical errors to what-not-to-include-in-a-resumeflowery language and absent keywords, there’s certainly no shortage of resume mistakes you could make. But there is one surefire kiss of death for most job seekers: submitting a two- or, dare we say it, threepage resume.

“If you’re fresh out of college, you may have a few internships under your belt but by no means should you have a two-page resume,” says Christopher Ward, founder at Ward Resumes.

Even many mid- and executive-level job hunters would benefit by sticking to a one-page resume, says professional resume writer Laurie J. James, since hiring managers have short attention spans. “When your resume is competing with dozens or hundreds of applications, hiring managers don’t have time to look at a two-page resume,” she says.

Don’t think you can shorten your resume to one 8.5”×11” document? Here’s how to squeeze everything onto one page so you’ll outshine the competition.

Click here to read the full story.

Advertisements