How to choose a college major when you’re interested in everything

It’s a question every would-be college student will ask at one point: “What should I major in?” Thing is, the answer might change—a few times.

So you graduated high school thinking your college major would be political science. Then you got to college and comparative literature became your jam—for a while, that is. Now you’re thinking law school. Or engineering. Or should you just go back to poli-sci? Or would throwing a dart at a list of majors help you decide best?

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How to be the intern everybody wants to hire

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Aiming to turn your summer internship into a full-time job? Good news: your employer wants that, too!

The primary focus of most companies’ internship programs is to convert college students into entry-level employees, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers’ 2016 Internship & Co-op Survey. But if you intern for a medium or large company, you’ll likely be working alongside a group of interns who are also gunning for a job offer. And unfortunately, there may be a limited number of full-time jobs available at the company.

So to land one of them, you’ll need to bring your A-game. Take these steps to become the all-star intern.

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The Changing Economics of Student-Loan Debt: How to Pay It Off and Startup

President Obama may soon sign into law piggy_graduate-590x393a new student-loan bill that reduces rates for brand new borrowers. But the rising cost of college will surely continue to hit students where it hurts: Their future.

College students who funded their education with borrowed money, left school in 2011 with an average $26,600 in student-loan debt, up 5 percent from $25,250 in 2010, according to the latest report from the Project on Student Debt at The Institute for College Access & Success.

Saddled with such a hefty debt load, many young entrepreneurs might put off or even forgo starting up, as launching and failing may put them in an even worse lurch. For those who proceed, they’re forced to juggle heaping monthly payments with the costs of starting a business. It’s a challenge some shy away from, but there are routes millennials can take to startup without student-loan debt wrecking their companies.

Click here to read more about how young entrepreneurs can eliminate or reduce their debt loads.

Boomerang Kids vs. Parents: How to Minimize Conflict

Joe Liebeskind interned with the Young-Adult-Leaving-Home560x350New Jersey Nets (now called the Brooklyn Nets) in the summer of his junior year of college. At the end of the internship, his coordinator said a job would be waiting for him once he finished school. But the diploma he received in December 2008 wasn’t the golden ticket he thought it would be—bad timing meant the team couldn’t hire him.

After graduating from Pennsylvania State University, Joe moved back in with his parents in Hillsdale, N.J., for three-and-a-half years. However, his decision to live at home wasn’t a result of not landing a job with the basketball team. “I was always planning to move home for at least a year to try and [save] some money, as to not be living paycheck to paycheck with the cost of rent,” he says.

Many of today’s college graduates follow Joe’s path. An estimated 3 in 10 young adults have moved back in with their parents in recent years, according to a Pew Research Center survey released in March. Saving money is their chief concern, as nearly 80 percent of those currently living at home say they don’t have enough money put away to lead the kind of independent life they want.

Many of today’s graduates—known as “boomerang kids”—are turning to their parents for monetary support. They’ve returned to their childhood homes, hoping that living under their parents’ roof will enable them to find a job and save enough money to move out.However, moving back home can lead to arguments between kids and their parents and can potentially damage their relationship in the long term. Parents who prepare for these challenges before greeting their kids at the front door have a better chance of avoiding these hardships. Click here to read the article.