You’d Better Ask These 5 Crucial Questions Before You Buy a House

No matter how many episodes of “House Hunters” or “Love It or List It” you’ve watched, buying a home inevitably comes with surprises. Though a sharp real estate agent will help you navigate these hidden challenges, before you start shopping for a house, you should take account of some important things that you probably haven’t considered.

Curious what you might be missing? Here are five questions you’d never think to ask yourself but totally should before buying a home.

Click here to read the full story.

5 Common Myths About Home Appraisals That Aren’t True

So, you’ve found the home of your dreams! Before you pop the Champagne, you’ve still got a few steps before the deal is done. One of those is the home appraisal.

If you’re getting a mortgage, your lender will order an appraisal to have the property’s value professionally assessed. This helps ensure that the home is worth enough to serve as collateral for the value of the loan. That means the home must appraise at, or above, the agreed-upon purchase price.

It seems straightforward enough, but the process can be confusing, especially for first-timers. Here are five common myths about home appraisals.

Click here to read the full story.

6 Things You’ll Love—and Hate—About Buying a Home This Spring

Welcome to the best—and worst—time to buy a home: spring! Yes, it’s peak home-buying season. However, it’s no bed of roses.

Knowing what to expect is half the battle, and can help you use these highs and lows to your advantage!

So consider this an essential prep course. Ready to dive into the best of times and the worst of times for home buying?

Click here to read the full story.

Buying a Home? 7 Unsettling Emotions You’ll Feel Before the Deal Is Done

Buying a home may be a financial transaction, but it’s a highly emotional one, too. And while there are highs—like the moments you know you’ve found The One or you get the keys to your new home—you may also go through periods of high anxiety or hopelessness before you close the deal.

Ask any homeowner about their experiences buying a home, and you’ll hear a similar refrain: Purchasing property is utterly nerve-racking. With so many moving pieces, buying a home can feel like a high-stakes juggling act—only you don’t have time to practice.

Click here to read the full story.

Should You Buy a New Home Before Selling Yours?

For many, it’s an enviable situation: You own a house and have the ability to buy a new home before selling your current place.

But even if you have the cash — or can qualify for a second mortgage — you’ll want to consider a few pros and cons before making the offer. One big consideration: In a seller’s market where houses are going for (or even above) list price, making an offer that’s contingent on the sale of your current home can make it difficult to compete against first-time buyers.

Click here to read the full story.

Eek! 5 Scary Things That Could Be Hiding in That Home You Want to Buy

No matter how dreamy a home looks cracked-foundation-1a249b3a11567510VgnVCM100000d7c1a8c0____at first glance, lurking behind those neatly painted walls could be some truly terrifying things. We’re not talking about ghosts or bats, but things like small cracks in the ceiling, tiny holes in the drywall, or a musty odor in the basement—seemingly minor issues that should make you very, very afraid.

Rest assured, we’re not trying to scare you from buying a home altogether! We simply want to provide you with a list of red flags to watch out for, because they could cause health problems or cost major money to fix. All in all, they are headaches that you’ll want to avoid—or, at least, point out to the sellers so you can negotiate down that list price. So if you find any of these problems, make sure to proceed with caution.

Click here to read the full story.

How to Get a Mortgage With No Credit

Trying to buy a home with bad credit is hard. 635699433608611976-credit-score_2513595_ver1.0But what about trying to buy a home with no credit at all?

There’s a name for these people: “credit invisibles.” It means they don’t have a credit report or score on file with the three major credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion), usually because they don’t have a traditional credit trail such as a credit card or college loan. Far from being anomalies lurking on the fringes of society, credit invisibles are shockingly common.

According to a recent report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, roughly 45 million Americans are characterized as credit invisible. Meanwhile, 19.4 million are known by another equally ominous label: “credit unscorable.” That means they have some credit history, but not enough to generate a score. For example, they might have had credit cards or loans at one point but then stopped, usually due to financial difficulties.

Click here to read the full story.