The Not-So-Private Hell of Family Life in a Home With One Bathroom, Revealed

With real estate listings, the number of bedrooms is important, of course, but here’s a close second: the number of bathrooms.

Let’s face it: In a pinch, siblings can share a bedroom and guests can crash on a couch. But only one individual can use the loo at a time.

And this is why a home with just one bathroom makes many recoil in horror.

Click here to read the full story.

Should You Buy a New Home Before Selling Yours?

For many, it’s an enviable situation: You own a house and have the ability to buy a new home before selling your current place.

But even if you have the cash — or can qualify for a second mortgage — you’ll want to consider a few pros and cons before making the offer. One big consideration: In a seller’s market where houses are going for (or even above) list price, making an offer that’s contingent on the sale of your current home can make it difficult to compete against first-time buyers.

Click here to read the full story.

How to Sell a House: 4 New Rules That Can Make or Break a Sale

These days, knowing how to sell a Selling_keyshouse isn’t as simple as sticking a “For Sale” sign on your lawn. Times have changed—and the good news is the market is largely tilting in your favor.

“It’s undeniably a seller’s market,” says Linda Sanderfoot, a real estate agent with Coldwell Banker in Neenah, WI. In other words, buyers are demanding homes, but there isn’t much inventory on the market nationally. Plus, half of home buyers are worried about rising interest rates and looking to lock into a home soon. As a result, “there is pressure on buyers to submit offers quickly, and to offer full or even above list price,” says Peggy Yee, supervising broker at Frankly Realtors in Vienna, VA.

All of this puts sellers squarely in the driver’s seat—which can be a lot of pressure if your GPS is broken and you don’t know how to navigate this new world. Consider this your crash course in getting up to speed.

A Rent-Back Agreement Can Protect Your New Home

After months of house hunting, rentbackyou’ve finally found your dream home and the seller has accepted your bid. But there’s one problem—the seller isn’t ready to move out.

In such a case, a seller might want to go ahead and close on the home in order to have enough money to buy a new home. But in the interim, the seller needs a place to live. Linda Sanderfoot, a real estate agent at Coldwell Banker in Neenah, Wisconsin says that if you decide to let the seller stay, a rent-back agreement can protect you.

Click here to read the full article.

7 Smart Ways to Cut Your Moving Costs

paar mit sparschwein auf der baustelle

June to August is peak moving season, since most families want to relocate when their children are out of school. And for many families, a relocation can be expensive. The average professional move costs a whopping $12,230, according Worldwide ERC, an association that tracks mobility costs. (Moving can also be stressful: One study in Europe of 2,000 adults found that moving triggers more anxiety than even bankruptcy or divorce.)

If you’re relocating for a job, you can ask your employer to foot the bill. But if you need to pay your own way, follow these tips to make moving less painful.

Click here to read the full story.

Should You Sell Your Home When You Retire?

House in human hands

If you’re approaching retirement, you may be thinking about selling your home. But unless you need to move—such as for health issues—should you? While the main questions on your mind might be how close you live to your grandkids or a golf course, it’s essential to weigh what makes sensefinancially first.

Because let’s get real: Whether you dig the notion of baking away your golden years somewhere sunny or remaining in the family home to host Thanksgiving dinner every year, neither option will make much sense if you can’t afford it. Right?

So to help you get a handle on the pros and cons of aging in place versus making a new start for this next chapter of your life, ask yourself six questions.

Click here to read the full story.

How to Play the Just Right Market

Too hot, too cold, too hot. For more than a 150420_REA_spring_main_realestatehouse2decade the housing market has been nowhere near its Goldilocks moment, a just-right rate of growth that offers opportunities for both buyers and sellers. By certain markers, we’re finally starting to get there: Home prices nationwide are expected to rise 4.9% on average this year, according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). That’s closer than we’ve been in a while to the long-term average of 3.3%—and a lot more manageable than either the sharp drops of the bust years or the 12% spike we saw in 2013.

What does it all mean for you? If you’re a buyer, you don’t have to worry as much today about being priced out in a bidding war or by all-cash offers. Sellers who didn’t have enough equity in their homes just a few years ago to justify a move could find themselves in a much better position now. And renovators can still get low rates on home-equity loans and lines of credit. In short: If you’ve been sitting on the sidelines, this may be the time to act—or at least to do some serious number crunching.

Click here to read the full story.