How the Pandemic Is Persuading Millennials to Leave the City and Make Living in the Suburbs … Cool?

City living treated Dylan Gray well. For two years, Gray, 26, rented an apartment in downtown Indianapolis with bars, restaurants, and his office all in walking distance. But when the coronavirus pandemic required him to start working remotely, Gray set his sights on buying a home in Broad Ripple, a neighborhood with a suburban feel located six miles north of downtown.

“Once my ability to walk to work was no longer a factor, it made sense for me to buy a house, especially given how low rates are right now,” says Gray, a business analyst at Salesforce. He purchased a 3-bedroom detached house for $230,000 last month, using a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage with a 3.3% interest rate.

Before the pandemic, many Americans relished the perks of living in a big city. According to a 2016 Census Bureau report, about eight in 10 Americans lived in urban areas. But COVID-19 has some urbanites reevaluating where they want to live—and the type of homes the want to live in. During the second quarter of this year, 51% of property views by urban residents of America’s 100 largest metros went to suburban properties, an all-time high since Realtor.com began tracking metro level search data in 2017.

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Make Your Home More Appealing to Young Buyers

Millennials are powering the housing Milsbuyinghomemarket. For the third year in a row, Generation Y (age 18 to 35) comprised the largest group of homebuyers, making up 35 percent of all buyers, according to a March report by the National Association of Realtors.

If you’re considering putting your home on the market, you may want to think about doing some renovation work so that your home has greater appeal to younger homebuyers. That way, you may be able to sell your home more quickly and at the price that you want.

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7 Ways Boomers and Millennials Differ at Work

Despite the stubbornly high unemployment millennials vs boomersrate among millennials, millions in this cohort are working office jobs side-by-side with boomers who haven’t yet retired.

Given the age gap, the opportunity for conflict between generations is ripe, and it’s about more than just who forgot to clear leftovers from the office fridge. Millennials will make up 34 percent of the work force next year, but they’ll comprise 46 percent of workers by 2020, according to a report by the University of North Carolina.

Boomers and millennials have different views of work and life, which can clash in an office environment. Almost 25 percent of HR professionals reported some generational conflict in the workplace, according to a poll by the Society for Human Resource Management, in 2011, the most recent time the association examined the issue.

Click here to read about seven areas in which boomers and millennials just don’t see eye-to-eye when it comes to work.