How to tell if job cuts are coming

Getting handed a pink slip and being told to pack up your desk and exit your office is a terrible experience, no doubt—but it happens. Companies have job cuts for a number of reasons, and oftentimes these layoffs aren’t a reflection of a worker’s performance, which means there’s little you can do to prevent the inevitable. The people who land on their feet, though, are the ones who can spot a layoff before it happens.

So, how can you tell if your job might be in jeopardy? Check out some clues that a pink slip may have your name on it in the near future—and what you can do to keep your career moving forward.

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How to handle five types of toxic co-workers

Like toxic waste, toxic co-workers have to be handled with care. And it’s not healthy to have prolonged exposure to either.

“Whether it’s chronic backstabbing, extreme defensiveness, narcissism, cruelty, bias, discrimination or other forms of mistreatment or misbehavior that they demonstrate, [toxic co-workers] are intolerable to work with or be around for an extended period,” says Kathy Caprino, founder of Connecticut-based career-coaching firm Ellia Communications. “They’re toxic because they’re like a poison to your system and to the organization’s ecosystem, making it hard to maintain your own well-being, professionalism, and collaborative spirit when you’re around them.”

Worse yet, working with a toxic co-worker can negatively impact your job performance and even derail your career if they’re allowed to continue their behavior.

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5 job interview questions you should never ask

You may be camera ready with a spiffy job-interview outfit and your resume (15 drafts later, phew) and cover letter in hand, but now it’s time for the hardest part: preparing what will come out of your mouth. The job interview questions you ask a hiring manager can make or break your chances of getting an offer.

The key is to ask the right questions and “always think about how you’re being perceived,” says Courtney Templin, president of JB Training Solutions, a Chicago-based career development firm.

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13 things you should never write in a work email

Email etiquette is a delicate art, and one that’s important to master, considering the average worker spends 28% of their day checking email, a McKinsey & Company study found. But, when you use poor judgment in an email to your boss, co-worker, or client, you’ve created a digital record of your mistake that could come back to bite you.

As Jacqueline Whitmore, etiquette expert and founder of the Protocol School of Palm Beach, puts it: “An email is a permanent document that can be held against you.”

Another reason why the stakes are high: “Emails can be forwarded to anyone; they can even be posted on the Internet for the public to see,” warns executive coach Anne Marie Segal.

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5 times it pays to take a pay cut

In an ideal world, your pay would keep going up and up until the day you retire. Don’t count on it: Raises can be harder to come by late in your career, especially when you’re already making a good living.

Among college-educated workers, pay growth tends to top out at age 40 for women, early 50s for men, according to the salary research site PayScale.

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Can you spot these signs that your boss is lying?

Reality check: People lie. That includes bosses. Maybe they lie because they don’t want to disappoint you (“No, you can’t take Monday off”) or don’t have an answer (“I have no idea if anyone is getting raises this year”), but it doesn’t make their lies any less annoying.

Now, here’s the good news: You can learn how to tell if someone is lying to you—and you don’t need to administer a polygraph test.

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8 ways to stand out on LinkedIn

For any professional, having a well-crafted LinkedIn profile is a must. Done right, it can help you cultivate new connections, raise your profile in your industry, and land your next gig.

Case in point: 77% of recruiters say they use LinkedIn to search for job candidates, according to Jobvite’s 2018 Recruiter Nation Survey. That’s in line with a recent poll from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), which found that 84% of companies recruit through social media.

No matter your age, you have to figure out how to make your LinkedIn page more visible and grow your sphere. But workers over 50 face another challenge: How do you beef up your LinkedIn profile without making yourself look outdated or overqualified?

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