Can you spot these signs that your boss is lying?

Reality check: People lie. That includes bosses. Maybe they lie because they don’t want to disappoint you (“No, you can’t take Monday off”) or don’t have an answer (“I have no idea if anyone is getting raises this year”), but it doesn’t make their lies any less annoying.

Now, here’s the good news: You can learn how to tell if someone is lying to you—and you don’t need to administer a polygraph test.

Click here to read the full story.

Advertisements

Do this before you friend your boss on Facebook

Friending your boss on Facebook can be istock_000018815414small-3e42be492dafe94e86f5ad259fe254ddd25ee986-s900-c85a risky move. Let’s face it: We all have a skeleton or two in our virtual closet, and you’re basically giving your manager a front row seat. But studies show that adding your boss to your friends list can actually work in your favor—if you do it the right way, of course.

One-third of workers who are connected with their supervisor on Facebook say the online relationship enables them to perform more effectively on the job, according to a study by marketing firm Russell Herder. “There are benefits to connecting with your boss on Facebook, but you need to be hyperaware of how you’re managing your online relationship,” says Wharton School professor Nancy Rothbard, who studies the effects of social media in the workplace.

With the right approach, becoming Facebook friends with your boss—and effectively leveraging the connection—can help you build rapport, improve your offline communication and distinguish you from your peers.

Click here to read the full story.

Make Your Boss Your BFF

Buddying up with the boss can pay off, literally. Screen Shot 2015-06-01 at 5.04.54 PM
In a study of executives done at Georgetown University, nine in 10 acknowledged that favoritism occurs in larger organizations, and 23% of them said they had personally practiced favoritism in making promotion decisions. Read: Getting more familiar with the person who signs off on your raises can help you make sure they’re bigger. Follow these tips to cozy up without crossing the line.

Click here to read the full story.

Shifting From Buddy to Boss

Right after you celebrate that well-earned pcr1_15promotion, reality hits: You’re now the boss of people who had been your peers. “When you become a supervisor, the relationship structurally changes, whether you like it or not,” says Good Boss, Bad Boss author
Robert Sutton, a Stanford University professor who studies organizational behavior.

Going forward, your work will be judged on your ability to lead people with whom you used to consort and complain. If that’s not enough pressure, you’re now at risk of being the one complained about. Make the transition seamless with these steps.

Click here to read the full story.

Good Ways to Deal With Bad Bosses

The top reason people quit their jobs,bad boss ill according to a recent Gallup poll? A bad immediate supervisor. Bully for those who can—and want to—find another position elsewhere, but if you otherwise like the job or need it as a steppingstone, you’ll have to learn to live with that subpar superior. The right coping strategy depends on what kind of lousy your leader is.

Click here to read the full story.