13 things you should never write in a work email

Email etiquette is a delicate art, and one that’s important to master, considering the average worker spends 28% of their day checking email, a McKinsey & Company study found. But, when you use poor judgment in an email to your boss, co-worker, or client, you’ve created a digital record of your mistake that could come back to bite you.

As Jacqueline Whitmore, etiquette expert and founder of the Protocol School of Palm Beach, puts it: “An email is a permanent document that can be held against you.”

Another reason why the stakes are high: “Emails can be forwarded to anyone; they can even be posted on the Internet for the public to see,” warns executive coach Anne Marie Segal.

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5 times it pays to take a pay cut

In an ideal world, your pay would keep going up and up until the day you retire. Don’t count on it: Raises can be harder to come by late in your career, especially when you’re already making a good living.

Among college-educated workers, pay growth tends to top out at age 40 for women, early 50s for men, according to the salary research site PayScale.

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10 career resolutions you can absolutely accomplish in 2019

It’s that time of year again—time to set those New Year goals. At this point, though, you know the drill: You set a goal (no more carbs!), stick to it for a month (if you’re lucky), and then revert to your old habits. In fact, US News & World Report found that roughly 80% of resolutions fail by the second week of February, so the odds are against you.

This doesn’t mean you’re doomed to fail, but it does mean you need to be realistic. Your sights must be set on targets that are within your reach. Beware biting off more than you can chew.

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10 Life Hacks That Will Make You Richer

Picking up new skills as an adult 150302_HO_LifeHackscan be tricky, especially when your energy and free time is precious. But prowess in different areas is not all created equal. Investing in certain abilities can get you big rewards for relatively little effort. MONEY interviewed dozens of experts in different fields to find out which skills, tricks, and workarounds are most financially worthwhile.

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Shifting From Buddy to Boss

Right after you celebrate that well-earned pcr1_15promotion, reality hits: You’re now the boss of people who had been your peers. “When you become a supervisor, the relationship structurally changes, whether you like it or not,” says Good Boss, Bad Boss author
Robert Sutton, a Stanford University professor who studies organizational behavior.

Going forward, your work will be judged on your ability to lead people with whom you used to consort and complain. If that’s not enough pressure, you’re now at risk of being the one complained about. Make the transition seamless with these steps.

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Good Ways to Deal With Bad Bosses

The top reason people quit their jobs,bad boss ill according to a recent Gallup poll? A bad immediate supervisor. Bully for those who can—and want to—find another position elsewhere, but if you otherwise like the job or need it as a steppingstone, you’ll have to learn to live with that subpar superior. The right coping strategy depends on what kind of lousy your leader is.

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Ace your annual review

No two words inspire more dread Performance review illustrationin managers and employees alike than these: performance reviews. Rather than letting your annual checkup get you down, though, consider the upside. This is one of the few times of the year you get to chat with your boss about your career. And with a bit of strategizing, you can set the stage for a big raise or promotion in the year to come.

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