What not to say during salary negotiation

Finally, after making it through a grueling interview process you receive that job offer you’ve been gunning for all along. Still, there’s one more hurdle to cross, and that’s salary negotiation.

Though salary isn’t the only factor to consider when weighing a job offer—other incentives, such as a signing bonus, flexible work schedule, or relocation assistance, may help sweeten the deal—getting a fatter paycheck would certainly be nice.

To nab a higher salary, however, you’ll have to do some negotiating. Now, here’s a lesson that may surprise you: What you don’t say is just as (or potentially even more) important than what you do say.

Click here to read the full story.

Advertisements

5 times it pays to take a pay cut

In an ideal world, your pay would keep going up and up until the day you retire. Don’t count on it: Raises can be harder to come by late in your career, especially when you’re already making a good living.

Among college-educated workers, pay growth tends to top out at age 40 for women, early 50s for men, according to the salary research site PayScale.

Click here to read the full story.

Learn how to get a high-paying job

Want a bigger paycheck? Of course you do. Business woman climbing up on hand drawn staircase conceptThere’s nothing wrong with wanting to get a job where you can make money—lots of it. In fact, 63% of workers said compensation was “very important” to their overall job satisfaction, a recent Society for Human Resource Management survey found.

Unfortunately, the average raise is only 3%, according to WorldatWork’s 2017 Salary Budget Survey. So how can you make money fast instead of waiting for your salary to grow over time? By revving up your job search to focus on jobs that pay well. Yeah, that sounds obvious, but there’s actually a science behind it.

Click here to read the full story.

How to Take Advantage of Your Boss’s Biggest Fear

Star performers, rejoice. This is your aaeaaqaaaaaaaamjaaaajgjjote5owyxlwvlndatnda2ns04zmriltu0n2q3njqwytawzqyear. More than three-quarters of human resources executives polled recently by Challenger Gray & Christmas report that they are struggling to fill open positions—and 91% say that if the economy keeps expanding at its current rate, the war for talent will worsen. Unemployment is in fact expected to continue its slow creep downward in 2015, to 5.7% from 5.9% this September, according to the Philadelphia Federal Reserve’s most recent forecast.

That means bad news ahead for employers but good news for top producers, who will have real leverage in the coming year. Turnover costs are especially high for positions that are significant contributors to revenue—sometimes 200% of a worker’s salary. So it’s no wonder that 57% of the 4,700 companies surveyed in PayScale.com’s recent “Compensation Best Practices Report” cited keeping high-performing workers as a top business concern, up from 20% in 2010. “Just about every HR department should be discussing talent retention,” says David Card, director at the Center for Labor Economics at the University of California at Berkeley.

You can turn your boss’s anxiety to your advantage. Click here to read the full story.

6 Character Traits that Can Nail a Promotion

Gunning for a raise or promotion? Better start happy-coworkersmaking nice with your coworkers.

People who initiate friendships at work, offer their colleagues help and engage with office mates at social events are 40 percent more likely to get a promotion, according to a 2011 study by Shawn Achor, a lecturer on psychology at Harvard University and author of The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work.

While skills, experience and results delivered are obviously factors in career advancement, one’s likeability is also a key component of workplace success. If you’re too competitive (or too much of a brown-noser), you can alienate the very coworkers who could be crucial to your success. After all, bosses don’t want to promote people who are disliked around the office. Even if you’re not hanging out during non-office hours, you’re probably spending more time with your colleagues than with your non-work pals. So building relationships may be one reason that 30 percent of those polled by Monster said that friendships make work a lot more pleasant.

Click here to see what steps to take to win over your boss and your colleagues.