9 Ways to Make This Your Best Career Year Ever

Want to score a raise or clinch that careerladder-620x400title bump this year? Who are we kidding; of course you do! As 2017 settles in and companies gear up for first-quarter promotions and new hires, it’s prime time to rethink your professional goals and what you hope to accomplish over the next 12 months.

“A lot goes on in the workplace at the beginning of the year,” says Brandi Britton, district president at OfficeTeam, a national staffing firm. “Hiring picks back up in January, companies do annual performance reviews and managers reflect on what challenges they’re going to face over the next 12 months.”

Whether you’re working toward that corner office or just want to put yourself out there in the best light possible and see what opportunities come your way, consider making these New Year career moves.

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Make Your Boss Your BFF

Buddying up with the boss can pay off, literally. Screen Shot 2015-06-01 at 5.04.54 PM
In a study of executives done at Georgetown University, nine in 10 acknowledged that favoritism occurs in larger organizations, and 23% of them said they had personally practiced favoritism in making promotion decisions. Read: Getting more familiar with the person who signs off on your raises can help you make sure they’re bigger. Follow these tips to cozy up without crossing the line.

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6 Character Traits that Can Nail a Promotion

Gunning for a raise or promotion? Better start happy-coworkersmaking nice with your coworkers.

People who initiate friendships at work, offer their colleagues help and engage with office mates at social events are 40 percent more likely to get a promotion, according to a 2011 study by Shawn Achor, a lecturer on psychology at Harvard University and author of The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work.

While skills, experience and results delivered are obviously factors in career advancement, one’s likeability is also a key component of workplace success. If you’re too competitive (or too much of a brown-noser), you can alienate the very coworkers who could be crucial to your success. After all, bosses don’t want to promote people who are disliked around the office. Even if you’re not hanging out during non-office hours, you’re probably spending more time with your colleagues than with your non-work pals. So building relationships may be one reason that 30 percent of those polled by Monster said that friendships make work a lot more pleasant.

Click here to see what steps to take to win over your boss and your colleagues.