10 career resolutions you can absolutely accomplish in 2019

It’s that time of year again—time to set those New Year goals. At this point, though, you know the drill: You set a goal (no more carbs!), stick to it for a month (if you’re lucky), and then revert to your old habits. In fact, US News & World Report found that roughly 80% of resolutions fail by the second week of February, so the odds are against you.

This doesn’t mean you’re doomed to fail, but it does mean you need to be realistic. Your sights must be set on targets that are within your reach. Beware biting off more than you can chew.

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9 Ways to Make This Your Best Career Year Ever

Want to score a raise or clinch that careerladder-620x400title bump this year? Who are we kidding; of course you do! As 2017 settles in and companies gear up for first-quarter promotions and new hires, it’s prime time to rethink your professional goals and what you hope to accomplish over the next 12 months.

“A lot goes on in the workplace at the beginning of the year,” says Brandi Britton, district president at OfficeTeam, a national staffing firm. “Hiring picks back up in January, companies do annual performance reviews and managers reflect on what challenges they’re going to face over the next 12 months.”

Whether you’re working toward that corner office or just want to put yourself out there in the best light possible and see what opportunities come your way, consider making these New Year career moves.

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5 traits employers really want younger workers to have

Curious as to what skills you need softskillsto score your first job? Here’s a hint: It’s not PowerPoint, Excel or Photoshop. A new survey from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) found that employers care more about “soft skills”—such as integrity, reliability and teamwork—than they do technical abilities like reading comprehension and mathematics.

That’s not surprising, says Kathy Robinson, founder of Boston-based career coaching firm TurningPoint and former entry-level recruiter. “Hard skills can be taught,” she says. “Employers are more concerned about whether a job candidate has the right attitude and work ethic.”

Here are the five skills employers say they value most in younger employees—and what you can do during a job interview to prove that you’ve got them.

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