How HR Practitioners Can Grow Their Skill Sets

Like many professionals, HR practitioners have experienced furloughs, layoffs or reduced hours as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. But there’s a silver lining: Having more time on your hands means you have an opportunity to focus on your professional development, which can be a game changer for your career.

“We live in a skills-based economy,” says Latesha Byrd, a Charlotte, N.C.-based professional career coach and consultant. In other words, many employers base their hiring decisions on a job candidate’s abilities; thus, having a robust set of skills makes you more marketable to employers.

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How to Build Your Professional Network Digitally

When the coronavirus pandemic spread across the U.S., it forced millions of Americans to shelter in place—closing thousands of restaurants, bars and other “nonessential” businesses. It also shut down professional conferences and events, leaving many workers with only one way to network: virtually.

Luckily, most HR practitioners know their way around social media. After all, 84 percent of recruiters said they use social networks such as Facebook and Twitter to search for talent, according to Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) research.

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How HR Practitioners Can Win Friends at Work

Cultivating authentic relationships with co-workers provides the support system you need to perform your job well. It’s also a key ingredient for job happiness—in fact, one Gallup poll found that close work friendships boost employee satisfaction by 50 percent, and employees with a best friend at work are seven times more likely to engage fully in their jobs.

Another reason why getting along well with your colleagues is important? Most workers logging 30 to 50 hours in the office spend more time with their co-workers than with their family members, according to a Globoforce survey.

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The 7 C’s of Becoming an HR Thought Leader

“Thought leader”―what does that even mean? It’s a phrase that has been overused to the point of being a cliché, yet it’s still a status many covet. While there’s no textbook definition of the term, a thought leader is generally a person whose thinking shapes that of others and spurs conversations within his or her field of expertise. The label has gained currency in recent years, since anyone with access to a computer now has the opportunity to influence multitudes.

“A thought leader is someone who professionals look to for advice or insight,” says Tamara Rasberry, SHRM-CP, principal HR consultant at Rasberry Consulting LLC in Washington, D.C. She, like everyone quoted in this article, is considered a thought leader in her own right, as a frequent contributor to HR blogs and on social networks.

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Can Blind Hiring Improve Workplace Diversity?

As an HR department of one, Katherine McNamee, SHRM-CP, knew she didn’t have the resources or technology to implement a sophisticated blind recruiting platform that would strip identifying information—

such as a candidate’s name and college graduation date—from resumes. Yet the director of HR at the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), a nonprofit with 40 employees in Arlington, Va., was determined to take a fresh approach to reducing hiring bias when she was filling fellowship positions at AAM’s Center for the Future of Museums.

“There has been a lot of discussion about diversity in the museum field, and we wanted to experiment with blind hiring,” she says. “We felt we were attracting the right candidates, but we also wanted to broaden our applicant pool.”

So she took a simple step toward eliminating key data from resumes—by telling people not to include it in the first place.

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Original Onboarding Options from 4 HR Leaders

The war for talent isn’t won when Balloon Onboaringemployees walk in your company’s door. The challenge simply changes from hiring them to keeping them—and that battle begins on day one with effective onboarding.

Indeed, smoothly integrating workers into their positions—and the company’s culture—is critical, given that up to 20 percent of employee turnover occurs within the first 45 days of employment, according to research by O.C. Tanner, an employee recognition company based in Salt Lake City.

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