Buying Wedding Insurance During the Pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic foiled many couple’s wedding plans this year, but at the same time, it has helped raised awareness of wedding insurance.

“When the pandemic first hit back in March, we were handling dozens of clients with cancellations, postponements, contract negotiations, relocations, and a flurry of questions from 2020 couples about how to move forward and handle their event in the safest and most reassuring way,” said Noelle Ahmad-Snedegar, who owns the Washington-based event-planning company Lily & Grayson Events.

“One question that we received many times,” she said, “and still continue to answer, is, ‘Do you think we should get wedding insurance?’”

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Wedding Canceled or Postponed? Here’s How to Get a Refund

Frank Dariano and Sharon Mensah had planned to marry on July 5, with 50 guests in attendance, at a resort in Banff National Park in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada. But they canceled the wedding shortly after shelter-in-place orders were issued in San Jose, Calif., their hometown. “Our plans really went south as the pandemic started cracking down on international travel,” said Mr. Dariano, an administrative assistant at an outpatient rehabilitation center in Sunnyvale, Calif.

Things got even worse when their venue refused to refund their $8,300 deposit. “We didn’t feel it was right to lose our deposit when no services had been rendered,” said Ms. Mensah, 36, a high school therapist in Sunnyvale. When pleading with the venue led to a dead end, the couple consulted a lawyer in Canada, who reviewed their contract and negotiated with the resort for a full refund.

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Planning a Wedding at Home? Here Are a Few Things to Consider

While many couples around the world are canceling or postponing their weddings because of the coronavirus pandemic, some are scaling down their plans and getting married at home.

Justine Roach, 31, and Hrishikesh Desai, 37, who are from Los Angeles, had originally planned to marry March 21 at Ojai Valley Inn, a resort in Ojai, Calif., before about 200 guests. The couple instead chose to exchange vows on the same day at the Beverly Hills home of the bride’s parents, with only their immediate family of six present.

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Curbing Hidden Wedding Costs

Creating and sticking to a budget can be a challenge for couples planning a wedding. The national average cost currently stands at $33,931, according to wedding website the Knot.

Unforeseen expenditures on things like postage, certain rentals or delivery charges can easily drive up costs. Event planners urge couples and their families to keep a close watch on some of these hidden or lesser-known expenses.

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How to Keep Your Proposal a Surprise (Hint: Ditch the Box)

When Steve Zimmermann, 39, thought about proposing to Kailey Smith, 37, the Toronto native wanted everything to be set up perfectly, and most importantly it had to be a surprise. The couple, who met while they were working at Homeguard Funding, an independent mortgage brokerage firm in Newmarket, Ontario, were engaged at the Ladies Pavilion in Central Park this past December. The proposal included a blanket, two mugs of hot cocoa, a pavilion glowing with string lights, and a photographer hiding nearby to capture the moment. And, to pull off the surprise, Mr. Zimmermann kept the engagement ring discretely hidden in his pocket using Ring Stash, a compact box designed to conceal an engagement ring.

“The box that the ring came in was large, and if I had it in my pocket Kailey might have spotted it ahead of time,” said Mr. Zimmermann.

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Booking Hotel Rooms for a Group? Here Are Some Tips

No one told my wife and me that planning a wedding would be easy, but we thought reserving a hotel block — a cluster of 10 rooms or more, at a reduced rate, at a hotel where our out-of-town guests could stay — would be a cinch.

Things started out smoothly. We found a modern hotel from a big hotel chain that had more than enough rooms to accommodate our guests. The hotel was only a couple of blocks away from our wedding location. It offered a competitive room block rate of 10 percent off the regular rate (which at the time we thought was a good deal). It had four stars on TripAdvisor. So we signed a contract.

I wish we hadn’t.

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Dos and Don’ts of Thank-You Notes

In the afterglow of a wedding or honeymoon, sitting down to write personalized thank-you notes can be a daunting, and often dreaded, task for most couples, especially those couples who have had large weddings.

But do not fret. Etiquette experts and professional card writers have some advise for making the process a little easier.

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Let the Wedding Games Begin

Meredith and Andrew Shackleford didn’t want their wedding to have an ordinary cocktail hour. Instead of having their guests sip drinks and eat canapés, the couple divided everyone into six teams to compete in a series of games that included croquet, ladder ball, and blindfolded wine tastings. The winning team took home bottles of champagne and a trophy.

“The games were a way to prevent people from staying glued to their phones,” said Ms. Shackleford, 34. “We wanted to create something where people could really get involved and interact with each other.”

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How to Handle Wedding-Planning Disputes With Parents

Wedding planning can stir up conflict between marrying couples and their parents. Some squabbles are minor. Should the table linens be white or ivory? What should go inside the welcome bags for out-of-town guests? But disagreements can turn into a wedge between families.

Insecurity, said Dr. Tamar Blank, a psychologist in the Bronx, is largely to blame. “Parents may feel insecure or vulnerable due to the fact that they are ‘losing’ their child,” she said. “They may want to feel more appreciation. Or they may have insecurities of their own that are impacting the way in which they treat their children.”

“Similarly,” she added, “children may experience insecurity as their parents may be paying for the wedding, while the child yearns for more power and control.”

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Tips for Building a Wedding Website

For many engaged couples, a personal website is an important part of the wedding-planning process. Often, it’s where guests go to find gift registry information, directions to the reception, preferred attire suggestions, and other useful information about the upcoming nuptials.

Seventy-four percent of couples who married in 2018 created a wedding site, up from 59 percent in 2015, according to the WeddingWire’s latest Newlywed Report.

Of course, not all wedding websites are created equally. What sets great web pages apart from so-so ones?

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