How to nail the most awkward kind of interview: the lunch date

Ah, the lunch interview—an audition that two-businessmen-shaking-hands-at-lunch-meeting-493585563-57717b175f9b585875c2d789combines the stress of a job interview with the awkwardness of a first date. To ace it, you’ll need to make a professional impression in a casual environment. That’s no easy feat.

“Hiring managers typically do lunch interviews because they want to see your personality come out and see how you behave in a casual setting,” says Amy Wolfgang, CEO at Austin, Texas-based Wolfgang Career Coaching.

But as the interviewee, you need to be strategic in your approach. “There’s a temptation to let down your guard and let it become a social event, but it’s still a job interview,” says Carole Martin, job interview coach and author of Boost Your Interview IQ.

The good news: “If a hiring manager is going to expense a meal for you, the person is seriously interested in hiring you,” says Martin.

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9 Ways to Make This Your Best Career Year Ever

Want to score a raise or clinch that careerladder-620x400title bump this year? Who are we kidding; of course you do! As 2017 settles in and companies gear up for first-quarter promotions and new hires, it’s prime time to rethink your professional goals and what you hope to accomplish over the next 12 months.

“A lot goes on in the workplace at the beginning of the year,” says Brandi Britton, district president at OfficeTeam, a national staffing firm. “Hiring picks back up in January, companies do annual performance reviews and managers reflect on what challenges they’re going to face over the next 12 months.”

Whether you’re working toward that corner office or just want to put yourself out there in the best light possible and see what opportunities come your way, consider making these New Year career moves.

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8 jobs where you get paid to travel

We get it. The daily grind in Cubiclevilleitems-you-shouldnt-take-on-summer-holiday can take its toll—especially on those who love to travel. The good news: There are plenty of great jobs for people with wanderlust.

And chances are, the younger you are, the more pumped you are to find a job with travel perks. According to a recent survey by Hipmunk, 38% of millennials travel for business, compared to just 23% of Gen Xers and 8% of baby boomers.

So, if you’re looking for work where you get to see the world, consider these eight careers where travel is an essential part of the job.

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5 questions you should never ask during a job interview

You may be camera ready with job-interview-basic-preparationa spiffy job-interview outfit and your resume (15 drafts later, phew) and cover letter in hand, but now it’s time for the hardest part: preparing what will come out of your mouth.

On paper, you could be the perfect candidate, but your interview is what will make or break your chances of landing a job offer. The key is to ask the right questions and “always think about how you’re being perceived,” says Courtney Templin, president of JB Training Solutions, a Chicago-based career development firm.

To help you out, Monster compiled a list of questions you should never (ever!) ask a hiring manager­—and what you should be asking instead.

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Land an out-of-town job early in your career

Having trouble finding a dream job fish-jumping-out-of-bowl-change2in your zip code? Why limit your job search to just one town? If you’re a recent grad, chances are you’re still young, with nothing much to tie you down. You have the flexibility to pick up and go, which isn’t so easy when you get older and start to settle down.

Plus, “if you’re willing to relocate, you cast a wider net and have more jobs to choose from,” says Philadelphia career coach Mindy Thomas.

Granted, this won’t be a cakewalk. Many employers are hesitant to hire out-of-town job seekers, since there are a number of expenses involved—and some simply don’t have enough money in their recruiting budget to pay to fly candidates in for interviews, let alone subsidize relocation costs (a rare offer for entry-level hires). But if you show prospective employers you’re worth a second look (and are willing to forfeit relocation expenses), you could find yourself at a new gig in a city you’d never even considered.

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How to Reach $1 Million

When you think of millionaires, 160815_MIL_Investwords like “privilege” and “opulence” often come to mind. What about “comfort”? That’s a term more commonly associated with the middle class. But while most American families enjoy creature comforts, they yearn for a more enduring variant—the peace of mind that comes from knowing you have the financial freedom to pursue whatever life you want.

That sense of comfort is more attainable than you might think. The truth is, becoming a millionaire isn’t about living like the 1%. It’s about doing all the little things at work or in your portfolio or in your budget that can move the dial 1% here and 1% there to achieve your financial goals.

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How to be the intern everybody wants to hire

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Aiming to turn your summer internship into a full-time job? Good news: your employer wants that, too!

The primary focus of most companies’ internship programs is to convert college students into entry-level employees, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers’ 2016 Internship & Co-op Survey. But if you intern for a medium or large company, you’ll likely be working alongside a group of interns who are also gunning for a job offer. And unfortunately, there may be a limited number of full-time jobs available at the company.

So to land one of them, you’ll need to bring your A-game. Take these steps to become the all-star intern.

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Hate Networking? Try This

Does the thought of working Screen Shot 2016-04-18 at 3.18.23 PMa room give you the jitters? Networking functions can turn even successful professionals into tongue-tied teens. Some people have such a visceral reaction that they actually feel physically dirty, a University of Toronto study found.

Yet industry events can also be a great place to rub shoulders with influencers, meet recruiters, pick up new skills, and raise your professional profile. So even if you hate schmoozing and small talk, these tricks can help you thrive at your next networking event.

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Do this before you friend your boss on Facebook

Friending your boss on Facebook can be istock_000018815414small-3e42be492dafe94e86f5ad259fe254ddd25ee986-s900-c85a risky move. Let’s face it: We all have a skeleton or two in our virtual closet, and you’re basically giving your manager a front row seat. But studies show that adding your boss to your friends list can actually work in your favor—if you do it the right way, of course.

One-third of workers who are connected with their supervisor on Facebook say the online relationship enables them to perform more effectively on the job, according to a study by marketing firm Russell Herder. “There are benefits to connecting with your boss on Facebook, but you need to be hyperaware of how you’re managing your online relationship,” says Wharton School professor Nancy Rothbard, who studies the effects of social media in the workplace.

With the right approach, becoming Facebook friends with your boss—and effectively leveraging the connection—can help you build rapport, improve your offline communication and distinguish you from your peers.

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Career Guide 2016

What are the best career moves to makepower-career-moves-help-get-noticed1 in your 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, and beyond? Check out my series for Money.com’s 2016 career guide, starting with job advice for millennials.

Then see what your resume should look like in today’s job market. (Hint: you’ll need to add some modern touches, like bolding your achievements throughout your work experience.)

Money.com has also designed a great resume template, courtesy of Wendy Enelow, co-author of Modernize Your Resume: Get Noticed…Get Hired. Click here to download it.